+Google

Social Icons

Showing posts with label Bad Credit. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bad Credit. Show all posts

9.09.2016

Digit Security Code 2

3-Digit Security Code
Proof that your card is in the right hands

The 3-digit security code shown on the back of your Visa card lets merchants know that you're physically holding the card when you make a purchase online or over the phone. It's yet another layer of protection Visa implements to prevent fraud before it happens.

How it works

1.
Shop online or by phone
The three-digit code authenticates your identity.
2.
Provide your 3-digit security code
This assures the merchant that you have your card in hand.
3.
Card issuer validates your code
The code is validated automatically during authorization. Merchants are not allowed to save codes.

Shop online or by phone

Shopping online or by phone – where a merchant can't verify your identity in person – always involves an element of risk. The 3-digit security code on your Visa card assures both merchants and consumers that the card is in the hands of an authorized user. If someone obtains your account number, he or she can't make a purchase without the security code.

Provide your 3-digit security code

You can find the 3-digit code on the back of your Visa card, next to your signature. You may see other numerals there, but only the last three digits make up the security code, which is also sometimes  referred to as the "CVV2 code."

Card issuer validates your code

When you give a merchant your CVV2 code at checkout, that information is sent electronically to the card-issuing bank for verification and authorization. If a person attempts to use your card number but cannot provide a 3-digit security code, or if the number is returned as invalid, the merchant will cancel the transaction. For security purposes, merchants are prohibited from storing this number.
Quick Tip
Never write down your PIN. Memorize it and keep it safe
More tips >

Questions?
Call the Visa Global Customer Assistance Center at (800) 847-2911
source

9.25.2015

Digit Security Code

3-Digit Security Code
Proof that your card is in the right hands

The 3-digit security code shown on the back of your Visa card lets merchants know that you're physically holding the card when you make a purchase online or over the phone. It's yet another layer of protection Visa implements to prevent fraud before it happens.

How it works

1.
Shop online or by phone
The three-digit code authenticates your identity.
2.
Provide your 3-digit security code
This assures the merchant that you have your card in hand.
3.
Card issuer validates your code
The code is validated automatically during authorization. Merchants are not allowed to save codes.

Shop online or by phone

Shopping online or by phone – where a merchant can't verify your identity in person – always involves an element of risk. The 3-digit security code on your Visa card assures both merchants and consumers that the card is in the hands of an authorized user. If someone obtains your account number, he or she can't make a purchase without the security code.

Provide your 3-digit security code

You can find the 3-digit code on the back of your Visa card, next to your signature. You may see other numerals there, but only the last three digits make up the security code, which is also sometimes referred to as the "CVV2 code."

Card issuer validates your code

When you give a merchant your CVV2 code at checkout, that information is sent electronically to the card-issuing bank for verification and authorization. If a person attempts to use your card number but cannot provide a 3-digit security code, or if the number is returned as invalid, the merchant will cancel the transaction. For security purposes, merchants are prohibited from storing this number.
Quick Tip
Never write down your PIN. Memorize it and keep it safe
More tips >

Questions?
Call the Visa Global Customer Assistance Center at (800) 847-2911
source

8.25.2015

How to avoid credit card security overkill

 When it comes to financial security, you can never be too cautious, can you? Perhaps. While protecting your credit and money is important, it's also possible to go to unnecessary extremes. Here are the most common safety overreactions to transform into sensible defensive practices.
Overreaction: Refusing to give your credit card to a waiter. Much has been reported lately about how waitstaff can take your credit card "in the back," steal its information with a skimmer and then create clone cards. But Annika Stensson, director of media relations for the Washington, D.C.-based National Restaurant Association, says to relax. "Like every other merchant, they must comply with standards, and those requirements have double and triple security," says Stensson. Restaurants "don't store PIN data, the point-of-sale (POS) systems are customized, and they don't use passwords." Bad eggs are weeded out, too. "It's in the best interest of restaurants to keep transactions safe since they rely on repeat customers," says Stensson, stressing that owners and managers aren't afraid to press criminal charges against thieves. 
Sensible: Charge your meal but review receipts. "Check your credit and bank statements and keep your receipts, says Stensson. If you spot a problem, call the restaurant to quickly resolve it, and remember that you won't have to pay fraudulent charges. Look out for increased levels of security against skimming, too. According to Stensson, an more restaurants are offering a "pay at the table" option with handheld POS systems.
How to avoid credit card security overkill
Overreaction: Not purchasing anything online. If you're reluctant to type your credit card numbers into a retailer's website, you're not alone. Forty-eight percent of respondents in a 2010 Center for the Digital Future study reported being very concerned or extremely concerned about privacy when shopping online. However, Hillary Mendelssohn, founder of the online shopping guide, ThePurplebook.com, believes much of the danger is a myth. Besides, she says, you miss out on a lot when just sticking to brick-and-mortar stores, including "the ability to have the entire shopping world at your fingertips, the convenience of having things delivered and getting better deals."
Sensible: Look for the "s."  Before charging, make sure the page of the website where you enter your card information begins with "https" rather than just "http." The "s" stands for secure. Mendelssohn also recommends looking for the seal of an outside security company, such as the TRUSTe symbol at the bottom of every CreditCards.com page, and to never give your credit card information as payment via email.
Overreaction: Completely rejecting credit. A cash-only lifestyle may appear safer than one that incorporates credit, but that's just not so, says Boston identity theft expert and McAfee consultant Robert Siciliano. "Credit is safer than cash," says Siciliano. "I don't worry about my credit cards or fraud at all. I use it over the phone, in real life, online, everywhere." After all, lost or stolen cash is gone for good, but if someone else uses your plastic, you won't have to pay for the fraudulent charges. More, if you avoid borrowing from a bank altogether, you won't build a credit score and history -- a requirement if you ever want to finance a home.
Sensible: Charge, but check. Use credit, but "pay attention to your statements," says Siciliano. "Check them online at a minimum every month. Every two weeks is better -- this way you can monitor fraud as well as your spending."
Overreaction: Being too afraid to get help. "Credit counseling will ruin my credit!" "They're going to yell at me!" Such are the fearful cries of millions of debt-ridden cardholders, but the reality is the opposite. Agencies never alert credit bureaus or creditors that you've had an appointment, and counselors won't judge or scold you. They will, however, develop a budget and offer a set of options you can take to deal with your financial troubles. If you pay your debt via their debt management plan, a lender can perceive it negatively, but it's not calculated into a credit score.
Sensible: Seek out reputable assistance. Real help does exist, but to know you're in the right place, make sure the agency belongs to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling or the Association of Independent Consumer Credit Counseling Agencies, the major accrediting agencies in the credit counseling industry.
Overreaction: Pulling credit reports constantly. Should you keep a close watch on your credit reports? Absolutely! But John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education for the Costa Mesa, Calif.-based company SmartCredit.com warns against going overboard. "It's definitely unhealthy and not necessary to check your reports every day or every week," says Ulzheimer. "The information won't change that rapidly, so it's a waste of time and money." 
Sensible: Pull reports annually. Under most circumstances, getting your consumer credit reports at AnnualCreditReport.com once a year for free is adequate. However, says Ulzheimer, if you've had past experience with identity theft, be more diligent. "Quarterly is a healthy frequency," he says. In that case, he also suggests subscribing to a credit monitoring service, as it can be more efficient and less stressful than doing it on your own.
With so much press about identity theft and fraud, it's easy to become overly skittish about having and using credit. But don't let it stop you from taking advantage of the conveniences and protection it offers. A few smart precautions can go a long way.
See related: Affluent are more often victims of ID theft, How to check for, fix ID theft or fraud, Credit monitoring services: How to pick the best one

7.25.2015

cvv number

Visa®, Mastercard®, and Discover® cardholders:
Turn your card over and look at the signature box. You should see either the entire 16-digit credit card number or
just the last four digits followed by a special 3-digit code. This 3-digit code is your CVV number / Card Security Code.

cid
American Express® cardholders:

Look for the 4-digit code printed on the front of your card just above and to the right of your main credit card number. This 4-digit code is your Card Identification Number (CID). The CID is the four-digit code printed just above the Account Number. 


6.25.2015

How to find the security code on a credit card

How to find the security code on a credit card

Find out where to locate the security code on your credit card.



Visa, MasterCard, Discover, JCB, and Diners Club

The security code is a three-digit number on the back of your credit card, immediately following your main card number.

American Express

The security code is a four-digit number located on the front of your credit card, to the right above your main credit card number.

If your security code is missing or illegible, call the bank or credit card establishment referenced on your card for assistance.
If you are not sure if you can use a particular credit card for your purchase, visit the appropriate support page:

4.25.2012

Where can I find the Security Code?


Where can I find the Security Code?
Where can I find the Security Code?Visa/Mastercard and Discover Users
Flip your card over and look at the signature box. You should see either the entire 16-digit credit card number or just the last four digits followed by a special 3-digit code. This 3-digit code is your Card Security Code.





Where can I find the Security Code?American Express Credit Card Users
Look for the 4-digit code printed on the front of your card just above and to the right of your main credit card number. This 4-digit code is your Card Security Code.
What is the Security Code?
It is an important new Internet security feature that now appears on the back of most Visa/MasterCard and Discover cards, and on the front of American Express cards. This new code is a three or four-digit number which provides a cryptographic check of the information embossed on the card. The security code helps validate that the customer placing the online order actually has the credit card in his/her possession, and that the credit/debit card account is legitimate.
How does my Security Code protect me?
The security code is only printed the card and it is not contained in the magnetic stripe information nor does it appear on sales receipts or billing statements - you must have the card in your possession in order to use this code.
Card Security Codes are not raised, so they are not scanned into standard credit card readers. In theory, these numbers are only visible to you. When you give your Card Security Code to a merchant, you assist the merchant in verifying that the order is being placed by you, the card holder.
 
Do I have to enter this Security Code?
If this code is printed on your card, YES, you must enter the code. Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express now require Internet stores to obtain the security code for all cards that have a code printed on them. In order for this transaction to be accepted and processed, you must enter this code if it's printed on your card. This is done for your protection.

What is a Card Security Code (CSC/CVV2)?

The security code is a three or four digit code printed (not imprinted or stamped) on your card. On Mastercard ,Visa, and Discover, the code is usually on the back of the card, to the right of the last four digits of the card number.
Where can I find the Security Code? On American Express, it is usually on the front of the card, above the card number.
American Express Example


11.16.2010

CREDIT CARD - Fix Bad Credit

Don't you ever feel that's the only thing you can think of? While driving, at work, talking to people, anywhere you go your mind just fixates into "fix bad credit repair bad credit bankruptcy do it". Wouldn't you like that to stop? I know more than a couple of million people who do.
Having bad credit is terrible; it's like having a leash around your neck every time you go to a mall, look at a commercial or read an ad. There are ways to get out of a bad credit situation but they tend to be difficult, so you should be prepared.

Important Facts

CREDIT CARD - Fix Bad CreditDid you know that three out of ten credit reports have erroneous data on them? Yes sir. But then again, with all the amount of information that floods the three credit bureaus - TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian - one, two, or three mistakes isn't that uncommon. Plus they don't get anything for maintaining correct records. They are just being paid to maintain the necessary data, whether it's accurate or not.
Having said that, you are free to call them, review your credit reports, locate your problem, and solve them. Did you know that if you have had credit denied you are entitled for a free credit report? Aren't things starting to look better? The phone numbers are listed in any phone book or you can just ask your bank for them as well.
Act

Having bad credit isn't like having just a bad taste in your mouth; it's the real deal. Banks and any other financial institutions will look at you as a risk, making them think many times before they grant you credit, resulting in denied credit most of the times. For this matter you must begin fixing your bad credit as soon as possible

CREDIT CARD - How To Apply For Credit

So you need to apply for a new credit card. Well, have you thought about applying for it online?
All of the major credit card issuers, and most of the minor ones, now allow you to apply via their websites. This offers a number of advantages compared with the old method of filling in a paper form and sending it by snail mail.
One big advantage is speed. Your application will be instantly received by the card company and at least some of the processing will be handled automatically. Admittedly the card issuer will want to make certain checks with credit reference agencies to ensure that you are creditworthy, so you shouldn't expect an immediate yes or no. However, the waiting period between applying for the card and getting approval for it is likely to be as much as a week less compared with the traditional method of application.
Another big advantage of applying for a credit card on the Internet is that it is very easy to research the best credit card offers. Nowadays there are hundreds of different credit cards available, all offering different combinations of terms and incentives. It is very important to study the market carefully, therefore, rather than simply filling in the first application form that arrives in your mailbox. Independent credit card comparison sites such as http://www.finest-credit-cards.com make this easy by listing all the best current credit card offers, updated daily.
Once you have found a card you are interested in, go to the issuer's website and study all the details of their offer. Check in particular for low introductory rates, cashback offers and balance transfer deals. If you are happy that this is indeed the card for you, look for a button labelled "Apply Now" or similar. Click on this and a new page should open, with an online application form ready for you to fill in.
The details you will be asked for are just the same as when applying for a card by mail. They will include your full name, address, telephone number, occupation, annual income, and so on. You are also likely to be asked some security questions, e.g. your date of birth, social security number and mother's maiden name. These are used to help prevent fraudulent applications.
Once you have completed the form to the best of your ability, click on Submit, and click again to confirm your application if requested. If you have omitted any information or filled in any parts of the form incorrectly, you will be asked to try again. Otherwise, you will see a message that your application has been received. All being well, you will then receive approval of your application within a few days, and the card itself shortly after that

Popular Posts

 

Blog Archive