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Showing posts with label Administration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Administration. Show all posts

9.09.2016

Digit Security Code 2

3-Digit Security Code
Proof that your card is in the right hands

The 3-digit security code shown on the back of your Visa card lets merchants know that you're physically holding the card when you make a purchase online or over the phone. It's yet another layer of protection Visa implements to prevent fraud before it happens.

How it works

1.
Shop online or by phone
The three-digit code authenticates your identity.
2.
Provide your 3-digit security code
This assures the merchant that you have your card in hand.
3.
Card issuer validates your code
The code is validated automatically during authorization. Merchants are not allowed to save codes.

Shop online or by phone

Shopping online or by phone – where a merchant can't verify your identity in person – always involves an element of risk. The 3-digit security code on your Visa card assures both merchants and consumers that the card is in the hands of an authorized user. If someone obtains your account number, he or she can't make a purchase without the security code.

Provide your 3-digit security code

You can find the 3-digit code on the back of your Visa card, next to your signature. You may see other numerals there, but only the last three digits make up the security code, which is also sometimes  referred to as the "CVV2 code."

Card issuer validates your code

When you give a merchant your CVV2 code at checkout, that information is sent electronically to the card-issuing bank for verification and authorization. If a person attempts to use your card number but cannot provide a 3-digit security code, or if the number is returned as invalid, the merchant will cancel the transaction. For security purposes, merchants are prohibited from storing this number.
Quick Tip
Never write down your PIN. Memorize it and keep it safe
More tips >

Questions?
Call the Visa Global Customer Assistance Center at (800) 847-2911
source

9.25.2015

Digit Security Code

3-Digit Security Code
Proof that your card is in the right hands

The 3-digit security code shown on the back of your Visa card lets merchants know that you're physically holding the card when you make a purchase online or over the phone. It's yet another layer of protection Visa implements to prevent fraud before it happens.

How it works

1.
Shop online or by phone
The three-digit code authenticates your identity.
2.
Provide your 3-digit security code
This assures the merchant that you have your card in hand.
3.
Card issuer validates your code
The code is validated automatically during authorization. Merchants are not allowed to save codes.

Shop online or by phone

Shopping online or by phone – where a merchant can't verify your identity in person – always involves an element of risk. The 3-digit security code on your Visa card assures both merchants and consumers that the card is in the hands of an authorized user. If someone obtains your account number, he or she can't make a purchase without the security code.

Provide your 3-digit security code

You can find the 3-digit code on the back of your Visa card, next to your signature. You may see other numerals there, but only the last three digits make up the security code, which is also sometimes referred to as the "CVV2 code."

Card issuer validates your code

When you give a merchant your CVV2 code at checkout, that information is sent electronically to the card-issuing bank for verification and authorization. If a person attempts to use your card number but cannot provide a 3-digit security code, or if the number is returned as invalid, the merchant will cancel the transaction. For security purposes, merchants are prohibited from storing this number.
Quick Tip
Never write down your PIN. Memorize it and keep it safe
More tips >

Questions?
Call the Visa Global Customer Assistance Center at (800) 847-2911
source

7.25.2015

How to find your credit card security code

Where your credit card security code is located
WHERE TO FIND YOUR
CARD'S SECURITY CODE
Every credit card has a security code used to help verify that the card is in your possession. Here are the codes' locations on American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa cards:
 It doesn't matter what you call them -- a card security code (CSC), card verification value (CVV or CV2), card verification code (CVC) or even a card code verification (CCV) -- those three or four digits provide an additional measure of credit card security when you make purchases online or by mail order. But, finding them can be confusing, especially if you've never made an online purchase with that specific card. 

The card security code "is one in a series of steps that merchants can take to prevent fraud and verify that the order is being placed by the actual cardholder," says Matthew Towson, senior manager of community affairs for Discover Financial Services, adding that in most cases, the only way for a cardholder to provide the security code is to actually be in possession of the card.

Where you find the security code depends on the card. If you have a Visa, MasterCard or Discover, turn the card over. In the signature box or just to the right of it, you will see a series of digits. However long the series, the final three digits are the security code.

American Express cardholders can find their security code on the front of the card, either to the left or right of the embossed 15-digit card number. These four digits are printed in black, not embossed.

Even as card issuers switch over to chip-equipped cards, security codes will still be printed and used the same way they are now, according to Doug Johnson, vice president of risk management policy for the American Bankers Association.

"For consumers who are conducting online transactions, it's still an important security measure to have," he said. "As we move to chip cards the goal is not to move away from those other important security measures that help protect consumers."

If you can't read the security code for any reason, call the issuing financial institution on the customer service number listed on the back of your credit card. Each financial institution will have its own guidelines for how to handle illegible security codes, but it may require reissuing the card.

Since the security code is a safety feature, just like your PIN, you will want to protect it. Generally, as long as you have a secure connection, you can safely provide it during online transactions.

 The merchant is prohibited, for security purposes, from storing the code. However, never provide it to anyone, whether you know them or not, in an email (email is unsecured communication).

 Once someone else has your security code, card number and card expiration, it will appear to an online merchant that the someone else, not you, is actually in possession of the card.


cvv number

Visa®, Mastercard®, and Discover® cardholders:
Turn your card over and look at the signature box. You should see either the entire 16-digit credit card number or
just the last four digits followed by a special 3-digit code. This 3-digit code is your CVV number / Card Security Code.

cid
American Express® cardholders:

Look for the 4-digit code printed on the front of your card just above and to the right of your main credit card number. This 4-digit code is your Card Identification Number (CID). The CID is the four-digit code printed just above the Account Number. 


6.25.2015

How to find the security code on a credit card

How to find the security code on a credit card

Find out where to locate the security code on your credit card.



Visa, MasterCard, Discover, JCB, and Diners Club

The security code is a three-digit number on the back of your credit card, immediately following your main card number.

American Express

The security code is a four-digit number located on the front of your credit card, to the right above your main credit card number.

If your security code is missing or illegible, call the bank or credit card establishment referenced on your card for assistance.
If you are not sure if you can use a particular credit card for your purchase, visit the appropriate support page:

5.30.2015

No Cash? No Problem.

Your Visa card is so much more than an ATM card – it’s your key to safe, convenient payments – every day, everywhere.
Visa cards are widely accepted at merchants across Egypt and abroad. It’s not only for expensive, high-value purchases but also for your every day spending:
·         Grocery shopping
·         In the pharmacy
·         Mobile bill payment
·         Your morning coffee
·         Lunch-time take-away
·         Online shopping and much more

Wave goodbye to cash!
Here’s the plus side. Visa has much more to offer you than cash!
·         Convenience
You no longer have to waste time standing in ATM queues. Simply pay with your Visa card at the till or check out point – it’s as quick as keying in your PIN and waiting for the approval
·         Security

A Visa card is far safer than carrying cash around. If your Visa card gets lost or stolen, you can immediately report it with Visa or your bank and have the card blocked. Visa also monitors and detects suspicious and fraudulent transactions on your account.
Learn more on how to keep your cardsafe!
·         Money Management
You will have a record of all your transactions and payments on your bank statement, which will show the merchant’s name and transaction amount - allowing you to keep track of your spending and stay on target with your budget. Your Visa card offers you the ability to control your budget and manage your money.
So don’t delay. Make the change to paying conveniently, easily and safely, today – every day and everywhere.
·         Name drop what your Visa card can shop to win!
This shopping challenge, should you choose to accept it, requires lots of speed and heaps of imagination. Want to know what we have in store for our Visa cardholders in Egypt? Then wave boredom goodbye and follow the fun all the way to our social media channels.

There are two ways to win a US$1,000 Visa Gift Card:

Between 6th – 13th May

Use the hashtag #cash2card to tweet about the everyday items you can buy with your Visa Card on twitter (as many as you can fit in 140 characters). Don’t forget to tag @visamiddleeast

Between 13th May – 5th June

Film yourself naming items you can purchase with your Visa Card (as many as you can say in 15 seconds). Upload your video on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram channels using the hashtag #cash2card for a chance to win. Don’t forget to tag @visamiddleeast and set your post settings to public so that everyone can see what you can buy.
Cash, be gone!

Click here for terms and conditions
Your Visa card offers you more than money!
Benefit from an array of exclusive offers that only Visa can bring you!



Card Fraud & Security FAQs

Q: I received an email/phone call from MasterCard about my account but it appears to be a scam or a phishing email. What do I do?
A: MasterCard will never solicit personal or account information from a cardholder and we suspect that the information you received is fraudulent. Consumers should always safeguard their personal information and refrain from responding to suspicious email/phone scams. If you suspect fraud on your account, please contact your issuing bank immediately to report it. We would appreciate if you could forward the original email to stopit@mastercard.com so that we may investigate.
Q: Someone called to offer a lower rate on my MasterCard but it seems to be a scam
A: Please be advised that MasterCard does not attempt to contact individuals to request personal information, including credit or debit card account information. If you receive an unsolicited phone call, email, text message, or social media request from an individual claiming to be a MasterCard representative: DO NOT RESPOND. MasterCard cardholders should always safeguard their personal information and not respond to any suspicious emails or other inquiries. If you are a victim of a phishing attack and believe your account information may have been compromised, please contact the bank or financial institution that issued your credit or debit card to report the incident.
Q: I believe fraudulent purchases were made on my MasterCard card account
A: If you believe that a transaction posted to your MasterCard card account is fraudulent you should immediately contact the financial institution that issued your MasterCard account and report your concerns.
Typically, there is a customer service number for your financial institution on the back of each card that you can call. You can always contact the MasterCard Assistance Center at 1-800-307-7309 or 'Collect' by dialing 1-636-722-7111.
Q: I know who has committed fraud on my MasterCard account
A: If you believe that you possess information about a person who has committed fraud by using your MasterCard without your permission, please contact the financial institution that issued your card. Financial institution contact information can be located on the back of your card, or on a monthly billing statement.
Q: I believe someone has applied for a MasterCard card in my name
A: Since MasterCard does not issue MasterCard cards we are not able to tell you if an account was opened in your name. You should contact immediately the financial institution that issued the account, and you :
  • Notify the financial institution and cancel the card account
  • Notify each of the three reporting companies about the identity theft so your report can be annotated properly
  • Even if you do not see an unusual creditor on their report you should formally write to advise of them of the situation
The credit reporting companies that may be contacted using the following web addresses:
Equifax         www.Equifax.com
Trans Union  www.TransUnion.com
Experian       www.Experian.com
If you do not know the financial institution, we recommend that you may want to order a credit report form one of the three nationwide credit reporting agencies. For more information go to ftc.gov and click on credit reports.
Q: There was a breach on my account and I received a new card
A: MasterCard appreciates the concern and diligence you are taking to protect your finances as it relates to MasterCard cards and the inquiry regarding a card account breach that has impacted you directly. We do take each card breach occurrence very seriously and work closely with investigative agencies.
Specific to card breaches, we encourage you to contact your financial institution for the most up to date information. Typically there is a customer service number on the back of each card for your financial institution that you can call.
Q: Please provide the name of the merchant where my card account was compromised
A: MasterCard appreciates the concern and diligence you are taking to protect your finances as it relates to credit cards and the inquiry regarding a card account breach that has impacted you directly. We do take each card breach occurrence very seriously and work closely with investigative agencies. Additionally, MasterCard has stiffened penalties to processors to help ensure each of these companies protects cardholder data with extreme care and diligence.
Specific to card breaches, MasterCard cannot determine which merchant transaction caused a card breach since this data is not generally provided to us. We encourage you to contact the financial institution that issued your MasterCard card for the most up to date information. Typically, there is a customer service number on the back of each card that you can call.
Q: Questions not answered here
A: If your question is not listed among the previous topics and questions, your best option is to contact the financial institution that issued your account as only they hold account specific and unique information. Typically there is a customer service number for your financial institution on the back of each card that you can call. You can always contact the MasterCard Assistance Center toll free at 1-800-307-7309 or 'Collect' by dialing 1-636-722-7111.
If you believe that your question can only be answered by MasterCard:
If you believe that your question can only be answered by MasterCard, Click here to submit your question.
Source

5.15.2015

Transaction Support FAQs

Q: How do I dispute a charge?
A: Please work through your card issuing bank to dispute a charge. Only your bank holds your specific and unique information including what rights you have to file disputes. The dispute process agreed to by banks that issue MasterCard accounts or process MasterCard transactions is set up to allow the banks to manage disputes with cardholders and merchants in a formal manner.
For Issuer and Merchant guidelines for disputes refer to MasterCard's Chargeback Rules:
www.mastercard.com/us/merchant/pdf/TB_CB_Manual.pdf
For a Merchant fact sheet on avoiding chargebacks visit:
www.mastercard.com/us/merchant/pdf/Avoiding_Chargebacks_Tips.pdf
Q: I never received an item purchased online or by telephone
A: If you purchased an item that was not delivered to you, or the incorrect item was sent, you should speak initially with the merchant to resolve the situation. If you and the merchant cannot agree to a resolution and you want to file a disputed transaction, this must be done directly with the financial institution that issued your MasterCard card to you.
Typically, there is a customer service number for you financial institution on the back of each card that you can call. You can always contact the MasterCard Assistance Center at 1-800-307-7309 or 'Collect' by dialing 1-636-722-7111.
Q: I purchased an item, but was sent the wrong item
A: If you purchased an item but were delivered the wrong product, we recommend that you speak initially with the merchant to resolve the situation. If you and the merchant cannot agree to a resolution, and you want to file a disputed transaction, this must be done directly with the financial institution that issued your MasterCard card to you.
Typically, there is a customer service number for your financial institution on the back of each card that you can call. You can always contact the MasterCard Assistance Center at 1-800-307-7309 or 'Collect' by dialing 1-636-722-7111.
Q: I want a refund from a business that has filed bankruptcy
A: To seek a refund from a business that has filed bankruptcy, but you are unable to locate the business, you can file a disputed transaction.
Typically, there is a customer service number for your financial institution on the back of each card that you can call. You can always contact the MasterCard Assistance Center at 1-800-307-7309 or 'Collect' by dialing 1-636-722-7111.
Q: The financial institution that issued your MasterCard card said that MasterCard denied my dispute
A: If your dispute case was denied, the financial institution that issued your MasterCard card will be able to explain the reason. Typically, there is a customer service number for your financial institution on the back of each card that you can call. You can always contact the MasterCard Assistance Center at 1-800-307-7309 or 'Collect' by dialing 1-636-722-7111.
Q: Questions not answered here
A: If your question is not listed among the previous topics and questions, your best option is to contact the financial institution that issued your account as only they hold account specific and unique information. Typically there is a customer service number for your financial institution on the back of each card that you can call. You can always contact the MasterCard Assistance Center toll free at 1-800-307-7309 or 'Collect' by dialing 1-636-722-7111.
If you believe that your question can only be answered by MasterCard:
If you believe that your question can only be answered by MasterCard, Click here to submit your question.
Source

6.23.2008

Administration

Administration
Federal taxes are collected by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), formerly known as "Revenue Canada" or the "Canada Customs and Revenue Agency".
Under "Tax Collection Agreements", CRA collects and remits to the provinces:
• Provincial personal income taxes on behalf of all provinces except Quebec, so that individuals outside of Quebec file only one set of tax forms each year for their federal and provincial income taxes.
• Corporate taxes on behalf of all provinces except Quebec and Alberta.
• Provincial sales taxes in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador.
The Ministère du revenu du Québec collects the GST in Quebec on behalf of the federal government, and remits it to Ottawa.
History
When the Canadian federation was formed in 1867, the British North America Act attempted to create a federal government with unlimited revenue gathering abilities. The federal government was entrusted with the high cost programs of the time, most notably defence and the building of railways. The provinces were given limited taxation power as they could only impose direct taxes such as sales taxes, property taxes, and income taxes (although they also maintained control over most resource revenues as well). At the time, it was believed that the provinces had adequate revenue sources as major areas of provincial government spending today were generally not funded by the government (such as social assistance and medical care).
For the early part of Canadian history most federal government revenue came from tariffs on trade with excise taxes making up the rest of the government's funding. The largest source of provincial funding was licenses, permits, and transfers of funds from the federal government. The first corporate taxes were introduced at the end of the nineteenth century.
A crisis developed during the Great Depression because the provinces were responsible for skyrocketing welfare costs, but could not raise enough revenue since the taxes permitted to the provinces were so dependent on the health of the economy. The federal government still had considerable revenues however, which resulted in a system of transfer payments between the two levels of government. The transfer payments are still in place today.
The First World War had mostly been financed by traditional means, but in 1917, a tax on income was introduced as a temporary measure to fund the war. The income tax has since become a permanent feature of the Canadian tax system. The Second World War led to dramatic change in the tax system. The percentage of Canadian government revenue from indirect taxes fell from 90% in 1913 to less than 40% by 1946. Instead, Canadians began to pay income taxes and direct taxes has since provided the greatest bulk of government funding.
Personal income taxes
Both the federal and provincial governments have imposed income taxes on individuals, and these are the most significant sources of revenue for those levels of government accounting for over 40% of tax revenue. The federal government charges the bulk of income taxes with the provinces charging a somewhat lower percentage. Income taxes throughout Canada are progressive with the high income residents paying a higher percentage than the low income residents.
Where income is earned in the form of a capital gain, only half of the gain is included in income for tax purposes; the other half is not taxed.
Federal and provincial income tax rates are shown at Canada Revenue Agency's website.
Personal income tax can be deferred in a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP), a tax sheltered savings account or mutual fund that is intended to help individuals save for their retirement.
Corporate taxes
Companies and corporations pay tax on profit income and on capital. These make up a relatively small portion of total tax revenue. Tax is paid on corporate income at the corporate level before it is distributed to individual shareholders as dividends. A tax credit is provided to individuals who receive dividend to reflect the tax paid at the corporate level. This credit does not eliminate double taxation of this income completely, however, resulting in a higher level of tax on dividend income than other types of income. (Where income is earned in the form of a capital gain, only half of the gain is included in income for tax purposes; the other half is not taxed.) Corporations may deduct the cost of capital following capital cost allowance regulations.
Starting in 2002, several large companies converted into "income trusts" in order to reduce or eliminate their income tax payments, making the trust sector the fastest-growing in Canada as of 2005. Conversions were largely halted on October 31, 2006, when Finance Minister Jim Flaherty announced that new income trusts would be subject to a tax system similar to that of corporations, and that these rules would apply to existing income trusts after 2011.

Sales taxes

The federal government levies a multi-stage sales tax of 5% (6% prior to January 1, 2008), that is called the Goods and Services Tax (GST), and, in some provinces, the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST). The GST/HST is similar to a value-added tax.
All provincial governments except Alberta levy sales taxes as well. The provincial sales taxes of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador are harmonized with the GST. That is, a rate of 13% HST is charged instead of separate PST and GST. Both Quebec and Prince Edward Island apply provincial sales tax to the sum of price and GST. The territories of Nunavut, Yukon and Northwest Territories do not charge provincial sales tax.
Provincial and federal sales tax rates at the retail level on goods and some services are as follows:
• Alberta:......................0 + 5% = 5%
• British Columbia:..........7% + 5% = 12%
• Manitoba:....................7% + 5% = 12%
• Ontario:.......................8% + 5% = 13%
• Prince Edward Island:..10% + 5% = 15.5% (PST applied to price + GST)
• Quebec:..................... 7.5% + 5% = 12.875% (PST applied to price + GST)
• Saskatchewan:............5% + 5% = 10%
Property taxes
The municipal level of government is funded largely by property taxes on residential, industrial and commercial properties. These account for about ten percent of total taxation in Canada.
Excise taxes
Both the federal and provincial governments impose excise taxes on inelastic goods such as cigarettes, gasoline, alcohol, and for vehicle air conditioners. A great bulk of the retail price of cigarettes and alcohol are excise taxes. The vehicle air conditioner tax is currently set at $150 per air conditioning unit. Canada has some of the highest rates of taxes on cigarettes and alcohol in the world. These are sometimes referred to by Canadians as "sin taxes".
Payroll taxes
Ontario levies a payroll tax on employers, the "Employer Health Tax", of 1.95% of payroll. Eligible employers are exempt on the first $400,000 of payroll. This tax was designed to replace revenues lost when health insurance premiums, which were often paid by employers for their employees, were eliminated in 1989.
Quebec levies a similar tax called the "Health Services Fund". For those who are employees, the amount is paid by employers as part of payroll. For those who are not employees such as pensioners and self-employed individuals, the amount is paid by the taxpayer.
Premiums for the Employment Insurance system and the Canada Pension Plan are paid by employees and employers. Premiums for Workers' Compensation are paid by employers. These premiums account for 12% of government revenues. These premiums are not considered to be taxes because they create entitlements for employees to receive payments from the programs, unlike taxes, which are used to fund government activities. The funds collected by the Canada Pension Plan and by the Employment Insurance are in theory separated from the general fund. It should be noted that Unemployment Insurance was renamed to Employment Insurance to reflect the increased scope of the plan from its original intended purpose.
Employment Insurance is unlike private insurance because the individual's yearly income impacts the received benefit. Unlike private insurance, the benefits are treated as taxable earnings and if the individual had a mid to high income for the year, they could have to repay up to the full benefit received.
] Health and Prescription Insurance Tax
Ontario charges a tax on income for the health system. These amounts are collected through the income tax system, and do not determine eligiblity for public health care. The Ontario Health Premium is an additional amount charged on an individual's income tax that ranges from $300 for people with $20,000 of taxable income to $900 for high income earners. Individuals with less than $20,000 in taxable income are exempt.
Quebec also requires residents to obtain prescription insurance. When an individual does not have insurance, they must pay an income-derived premium. As these are income related, they are considered to be a tax on income under the law in Canada.
Other provinces, such as British Columbia and Alberta, charge premiums collected outside of the tax system for the provincial medicare systems. These are usually reduced or eliminated for low-income people.
Inheritance tax
Since the government of Brian Mulroney in the 1980s, Canada has had no inheritance taxes. Instead, inheritance is treated as a disposal subject to the same capital gains taxation as, for example, the sale of the asset.
International taxation
Canadian individuals and corporations pay income taxes based on their world-wide income. They are protected against double taxation through the foreign tax credit, which allows taxpayers to deduct from their Canadian income tax otherwise payable the income tax paid in other countries. A citizen who is currently not a resident of Canada may petition the CRA to change his status so that income from outside Canada is not taxed.
International comparison (personal income tax)
Comparison of taxes paid by a household earning the country's average wage (as of 2005)
________________________________________
Country Single
no children Married
2 children Country Single
no children Married
2 children
________________________________________
Australia 28.3% 16.0% Korea 17.3% 16.2%
Austria 47.4% 35.5% Luxembourg 35.3% 12.2%
Belgium 55.4% 40.3% Mexico 18.2% 18.2%
Canada 31.6% 21.5% Netherlands 38.6% 29.1%
Czech Republic 43.8% 27.1% New Zealand 20.5% 14.5%
Denmark 41.4% 29.6% Norway 37.3% 29.6%
Finland 44.6% 38.4% Poland 43.6% 42.1%
France 50.1% 41.7% Portugal 36.2% 26.6%
Germany 51.8% 35.7% Slovak Republic 38.3% 23.2%
Greece 38.8% 39.2% Spain 39.0% 33.4%
Hungary 50.5% 39.9% Sweden 47.9% 42.4%
Iceland 29.0% 11.0% Switzerland 29.5% 18.6%
Ireland 25.7% 8.1% Turkey 42.7% 42.7%
Italy 45.4% 35.2% United Kingdom 33.5% 27.1%
Japan 27.7% 24.9% United States 29.1% 11.9%
________________________________________
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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